Menorah Foundation School

Menorah Foundation School

Chumash

The Torah is the defining element of our identity, the very fabric that defines us as Am Yisroel.

From Year 1 onwards, Chumash is introduced with a focus on a linear translation method. We begin with Beraishis and continue through the Parshiyos up to Parshas Yisro. Our teaching approach is a blend of the traditional and the modern, aiming to foster a sense of achievement and simche into our children's learning journey. We ensure that the teachings of Chumash are relevant to children's lives by drawing lessons in Middos and Hashkafa.

By the time children are in year 6:

- They should know where key issues and events are recorded in the Torah.

- They should be familiar with basic vocabulary to enable independent study both at MFS and in secondary education.

- They should understand the grammatical structure of words and be familiar with the layout of the Chumash.

- They should be able to follow the Torah reading in Shul.

- They should appreciate the essential nature of Rashi’s commentary for understanding the text and be able to analyse passages independently.

- Most importantly, we strive for children to enjoy learning and to appreciate the importance of our heritage, inspiring them to share this knowledge with future generations.

In terms of Chumash targets, each year group covers specific portions, with a calculated average of pesukim per day. For instance, Year 6 studies portions from Shemos and Year 5 from Breishis, each with specific omissions and detailed planning for the number of verses per day. Flashcards are used across the school up to level 18, with higher levels available for those who are more advanced.

From Year 3, we introduce Rashi, progressing to further study in Year 4 and beyond. By Year 6, children are expected to confidently read and translate basic Rashi, fostering critical thinking skills.

This curriculum is designed to ensure that our children are not only versed in the text but also in its broader implications, ready to carry the sacred chain of tradition forward with understanding and pride.